skip to Main Content

Sejla Murdoch

photo-sejla-murdoch-portraitSejla is senior psychologist with 20 years of clinical experience working with trauma. Sejla has extensive experience in providing therapy to survivors of domestic violence and refuge trauma. Later in her work as STARTTS’s clinician trainer she was given an opportunity to gain her experience in organising seminars and clinical master classes as well as providing support and training to others clinicians. Since 2007 Sejla has assisted on development of the Neurofeedback (NF) Clinic at STARTTS; the first clinic in the world to provide such treatment to refugees survivors of torture and trauma. Sejla has presented nationally and internationally on topics related to Biofeedback and NF in work with trauma. Sejla is providing clinical supervision and mentoring program to number of STARTTS Neurofeedback counsellor. Her passion is in understanding how trauma impacts early development and how NF combined with other modalities can assist children and their families. Currently, together with the clinic’s management she is working on establishing a Neurofeedback clinic that specialises in work with early childhood and trauma at STARTTS.

Abstract – Clinical Master Class – 14 November 2018

The impact of trauma on developing brain and the importance of caregivers’ ability to sustain and nurture the positive change

War, displacement and refugee experiences can have a devastating impact on refugee children and their families. Exposure to constant situations of chronic fear, dealing with multiple losses including the loss of country and the loss of personal power and identity means that the parental/care giver’s ability to provide secure attachment and safe family environment to their children is severely diminished.

Apart from the impact of early childhood trauma on attachment the research shows that the prolonged trauma affects the brain’s ability to effectively integrate sensory, affective and cognitive information into a consistent whole. As such this is impacting on child’s future, their ability to socialise, learn and integrate in a new society.

In this presentation Sejla Murdoch will use case studies to illustrate the impact of trauma on developing brain. She will also briefly discuss the application of Biofeedback in work with developmental trauma and importance of working on attachment and caregiver’s ability to support the changes in their children that occur though the process of therapy and how the interventions should be designed to support this process.

Abstract – Clinical Presentation – 14 March 2017

The impact of trauma on developing brain and the importance of caregivers’ ability to sustain and nurture the positive change

War, displacement and refugee experiences can have a devastating impact on refugee children and their families. Exposure to constant situations of chronic fear, dealing with multiple losses including the loss of country and the loss of personal power and identity means that the parental/care giver’s ability to provide secure attachment and safe family environment to their children is severely diminished.

Apart from the impact of early childhood trauma on attachment the research shows that the prolonged trauma affects the brain’s ability to effectively integrate sensory, affective and cognitive information into a consistent whole. As such this is impacting on child’s future, their ability to socialise, learn and integrate in a new society.

In this presentation Sejla Murdoch will use case studies to illustrate the impact of trauma on developing brain. She will also briefly discuss the application of Biofeedback in work with developmental trauma and importance of working on attachment and caregiver’s ability to support the changes in their children that occur though the process of therapy and how the interventions should be designed to support this process.

Recorded lecture published at Owl Talks Lectures.

Back To Top